Saturday, 9 June 2012

Gwyrch Castle



Gwyrch Castle is not as old as it might first appear. However, it is shameful that such a grand castle in such a beautiful location should have come to such a disgraceful state of ruin.The building of the castle was commenced in 1819.

This extravagant andgrand design with its cast iron windows must have looked magnificent upon completion. A marble staircase was added in the 1870's. Winifred Bamford-Hesketh, the Countess of Dundonald inherited the castle and lived here with her children.

During the second world war Gwrych was used to house Jewish refugees. The upkeep and expense of looking after such a large estate after the war caused Gwyrch to fall into a decline. Inevitably as with so many large manor houses and estates, it was sold in 1946.





During the second world war Gwrych was used to house Jewish refugees. The upkeep and expense of looking after such a large estate after the war caused Gwyrch to fall into a decline. Inevitably as with so many large manor houses and estates, it was sold in 1946.

Having changed hands in 1948 and sold to a Leslie Salts, Gwrych was opened to the general public. It remained a popular attraction for twenty years. Unfortunately since 1968 history has not been kind to Gwyrch. It has had many owners, most of whom seemed at a loss as to what to do with it. It closed in 1985 and has been neglected ever since.

Walking around the ruins and the extensive grounds of Gwrych the observier will no doubt try to imagine what this impressive building would have looked like in its former glory. Years of neglect, theft, vandalism and the elements, have left an empty shell.

In June 2006 Clayton Hotels purchased the castle for £850,000. They have announced a 3 year project to renovate the castle and convert it into a 5 star hotel. Lets hope that the future is kinder to to Gwyrch than its recent past.

 More details can be found at: www.gwrychtrust.co.uk/


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